Towers can move sideways in chess

Chess terms

The rook is the second strongest chess piece! It has a long range and is known to checkmate the opposing king on the baseline!

Here you can find out everything you need to know about the tower:


The tower

Each player has two towers at the beginning of a game. The rooks start the game in the corners of the chessboard. The white rooks start on squares a1 and h1, the black rooks on a8 and h8.

The towers together with the queen form the heavy pieces and are worth 5 points. A rook is therefore more valuable than a pawn, which is only worth one point, or like the bishops and knights, which are each worth three points, but not as valuable as a queen, which is worth nine points.

This is how a tower moves

As already mentioned, the rook is the second strongest piece after the queen. A rook can move forward, backward, or sideways, but not diagonally (like a queen or a bishop). The rook can move vertically up or down on any line. The following illustration shows the potential squares the Tower can pull on the e-line.

The tower can also pull horizontally to the left or right. In the following illustration you can see the potential squares that the tower on the fourth row can move to.

The easiest way to remember the squares a tower can move to is if you imagine a big + ..

A rook can move as far as it wants horizontally or vertically, as long as the line is not blocked by another piece. For this reason, towers are very effective when they stand on open or half-open lines, because then they are not obstructed by other figures.

A rook captures another piece by moving to the space on which this piece is standing. However, the rook cannot jump over other pieces like a knight. If it is blocked - as in the basic setup - it cannot move!

Checkmate and the baseline mate

Rooks can checkmate in many different ways, but we're only looking at three different options here: 1) Checkmate with only one rook. 2) Checkmate with two rooks. 3) The baseline mate.

In contrast to a bishop or a knight, a rook can also checkmate on its own, only with the help of its king. In this position White has just moved his rook to b8 and thus checkmated the black king! The white king prevents the black king from moving to a space on the seventh row and the rook not only gives the king check, but also takes away all of the escape spaces on the eighth row.

Checkmate with 2 rooks is relatively easy. In the following position White has just moved his rook to a8 and thus checkmated the black king. The rook on the seventh row prevents the black king from moving to a square on the seventh row and the rook on the eighth row not only gives the king check, but also takes away all of the escape squares on the eighth row.

Another checkmate is the famous baseline mate. A baseline checkmate is when the king (who could guess?) Is checkmated on the baseline. Here, however, the black king's own pawns prevent the king from escaping to the seventh row and the rook not only gives the king check, but also takes away all of the escape spaces on the eighth row.

test

Let's do a little test. Can the rook on e1 capture the black knight on e4?

Yes! The rook can move to the e4-square and capture the black knight! Let's try one more task. Can the white rook move to the c8-square?

Conclusion

Now you know on which squares the rooks begin the game, how much a rook is worth, how it moves and you have even learned a few checkmates! We wish you a lot of fun with your newly acquired knowledge and hope that your towers will find many open lines.


Watch the video lesson

Reading an article is a fantastic way to learn something new, but it's not for everyone. Watching a video can be just as instructive! Just watch this short video lesson on the Tower to better understand or deepen the concepts just explained. We'll see you again at the next lesson!