How thick is a woman's breast

Hardening, swelling, or lumps on the chest

Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women. That is why every breast disease and every lump in the breast, no matter how small, creates fear. As a rule of thumb, the more likely a lump is benign, the smoother it feels, the easier it is to define it, and the easier it is to move it against the underlying tissue. Even if several lumps form and there is significant tenderness to pressure, v. a. in the second half of the cycle, that should be seen as a good sign.

On the other hand, it speaks for the malignancy of a lump if the overlying skin is drawn in or bumpy (orange peel). In no case is it advisable to postpone the gynecologist's appointment for clarification too long and to lose valuable time. Because the smaller a tumor is when it is removed, the better the prognosis.

Symptoms, their causes, measures and self-help

  • Firm, possibly knotty and bumpy texture of the breasts as a tactile finding during the self-examination; often breast increase in size and soreness in the second half of the cycle; sometimes discharge of milky fluid from the nipple before menstruation; clear relief of symptoms with the onset of menstruation

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  • Single or multiple, smooth lumps that do not hurt or hurt slightly when put under pressure; slidable against the skin and underlying tissue; coarse, rubbery or resilient consistency

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  • Single, tight knotthat does not hurt spontaneously or when pressure is applied; possible indentations or bumpy surface of the overlying skin

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  • Painful, red swelling on one or (rarely) both breasts; mostly fever and malaise; usually enlarged lymph nodes in the armpit; possible discharge of yellowish-purulent fluid from the nipple

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  • Extensive, highly pressure-sensitive induration; usually after a blow or unusual pressure; often bluish discoloration of the overlying skin

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Firm, possibly knotty and bumpy texture of the breasts as a tactile finding during the self-examination; often breast increase in size and soreness in the second half of the cycle; sometimes discharge of milky fluid from the nipple before menstruation; clear relief of symptoms with the onset of menstruation

Root cause:

Measure:

  • In the next two days to the gynecologist if you discover a new lump or if fluid comes out of a nipple for the first time
  • If a mastopathy is known, a doctor's visit is not necessary

Self-help with pain:

  • Cooling envelopes
  • Tight, supportive bra
  • Hibiscus or sage tea
  • Possibly reduce salt, caffeine, cigarettes
  • Preparations with monk's pepper (e.g. Agnolyt®)

Single or multiple, smooth lumps that do not hurt or hurt slightly when put under pressure; slidable against the skin and underlying tissue; coarse, rubbery or resilient consistency

Root cause:

Benign changes, e.g. B.

Measure:

  • In the next two days to the gynecologist if you discover a new lump

Single, tight knotwhich hurts neither spontaneously nor when under pressure; possible indentations or bumpy surface of the overlying skin

Causes:

Measure:

  • In the next two days to the gynecologist if you discover a new lump

Painful, red swelling on one or (rarely) both breasts; mostly fever and malaise; usually enlarged lymph nodes in the armpit; possible discharge of yellowish-purulent fluid from the nipple

Causes:

Activities:

  • Immediately to the gynecologist in case of fever and severe symptoms
  • The next day at the latest, if minor complaints do not improve despite being cooled

Self help:

  • Cooling envelopes, e.g. B. Quark wraps, cool packs
  • For breastfeeding women: peppermint, hibiscus or sage tea

Extensive, highly pressure-sensitive induration; usually after a blow or unusual pressure; often bluish discoloration of the overlying skin

Root cause:

Measure:

  • To the general practitioner or gynecologist if the induration does not go away after a week

Self help:

  • If there is a fresh bruise, cool compresses, e.g. B. with quark or arnica toppings

Your pharmacy recommends

Palpate the chest regularly.

The better you know your own breast, the more likely you will notice changes such as small lumps or hardening. Therefore feel your breasts regularly, if possible once a month. The best time is shortly after menstruation because the breast tissue is then loose. Note: The regular breast examination does not replace the mammography, an early diagnosis examination financed by the health insurance companies.

Cooling envelopes.

If the chest hurts from a stroke or inflammation, cooling compresses will help to relieve the discomfort. A midwife's trick is putting quark compresses on the chest. The wraps not only cool, but are also supposed to have an anti-inflammatory effect. The cooling compresses are left on the chest until they have reached body temperature, usually 30 to 45 minutes.

Relieve chest.

To reduce chest pain and pressure, the chest should be relieved as much as possible. It's worth investing in well-fitting, supportive bras that at least better distribute the pressure caused by your own weight.

In the case of water retention like before the period, it has also been proven to avoid coffee, tea and chocolate in order to reduce the extra weight a little.

Complementary medicine.

If the breasts are swollen or painful before the period, this is often due to the increased production of progesterone during this period. The hormone ensures that more water is stored in the tissue - also in the breast. Many affected women report that taking monk's pepper relieves their symptoms. It is assumed that the effect is based on a regulating effect on the hormonal balance.

Authors

Dr. med. Arne Schäffler; Dr. med. Kay Goerke; in: Gesundheit heute, edited by Dr. med. Arne Schäffler. Trias, Stuttgart, 3rd edition (2014). Editing: Sara Steer | last changed on at 14:21


Important note: This article has been written according to scientific standards and has been checked by medical professionals. The information communicated in this article can in no way replace professional advice in your pharmacy. The content cannot and must not be used to make independent diagnoses or to start therapy.