Is it kufar to say Merry Christmas

Holy Quran ┬╗Accepting Christmas Presents - Yes or No ??

Contributions:245
Registered since:27.02.2008





Quote by Rabiyah Emine
: bsm
Selam aleykum we rahmetullah, thank you for your answers. Now I know what to do next time . But for my birthday I have a question: Can you celebrate it or not? Because I think I heard that our Prophet Muhammad that forbids, I don't know exactly anything either.


Rabiyah Emine



Allah (swt) gave us Muslims two feast days, namely Id-Ul-Fitr and Id-Ul-Adha. These are clearly from God and the Prophet (saws) celebrated these festivals. So these are part of our religion.
Nowhere in the Christian sources is to be found that Prophet Issa (as) ever celebrated Christmas (i.e. his birthday) or Easter (the day of his death or the day of resurrection). These are all things that were not introduced by God and not by Prophet Issa and are therefore not of Christianity either.
We Muslims live according to the Koran and Sunna. That means we follow Allah (swt) and his Prophet. If Prophet Muhammad (saws) did not celebrate Christmas and Easter and birthday, it is because he wanted to keep us on the right track so that we do not go astray like the Christians.

Celebrating Christmas with the kuffar is a bid'a. Not just a bid'a in Islam but a bid'a for Christians from the start. If all of this were correct, we would not have received absolute guidance from the Prophet (saws).

At the farewell sermon this verse was revealed to the prophet and he already says everything: "... Today I have perfected your religion for you and my grace for you and have chosen Islam for you to believe ..." (Quran 5: 3)

This means that religion, as it was brought on by the Prophet and without insertion, is flawless and perfect.
There is no Christmas and no Easter and no New Year's Eve and no Halloween and what other festivals do I know that have nothing to do with the original religion.

Sister, you were spot on when you told your parents you weren't going to take the gifts. But try not to celebrate these holidays. You can also give yourself a gift outside of the non-Muslim holidays, if there is no other way.
I was consistently not at my parents' house this year and asked (if they already had to buy presents) to give them to me on my holidays.
Anyway, Christmas is pretty hypocritical. As if a family atmosphere could only be created on these days, where everyone is happy ... tssss!

And one shouldn't congratulate either. It would be like congratulating these people on their kufr.

jump up
Contributions:281
Registered since:02.07.2009
Quote by Ameena-Malika
: bsm



Quote by Rabiyah Emine
: bsm
Selam aleykum we rahmetullah, thank you for your answers. Now I know what to do next time . But for my birthday I have a question: Can you celebrate it or not? Because I think I heard that our Prophet Muhammad that forbids, I don't know exactly anything either.


Rabiyah Emine



Allah (swt) gave us Muslims two feast days, namely Id-Ul-Fitr and Id-Ul-Adha. These are clearly from God and the Prophet (saws) celebrated these festivals. So these are part of our religion.
Nowhere in the Christian sources is to be found that Prophet Issa (as) ever celebrated Christmas (i.e. his birthday) or Easter (the day of his death or the day of resurrection). These are all things that were not introduced by God and not by Prophet Issa and are therefore not of Christianity either.
We Muslims live according to the Koran and Sunna. That means we follow Allah (swt) and his Prophet. If Prophet Muhammad (saws) did not celebrate Christmas and Easter and birthday, it is because he wanted to keep us on the right track so that we do not go astray like the Christians.

Celebrating Christmas with the kuffar is a bid'a. Not just a bid'a in Islam but a bid'a for Christians from the start. If all of this were correct, we would not have received absolute guidance from the Prophet (saws).

At the farewell sermon this verse was revealed to the prophet and he already says everything: "... Today I have perfected your religion for you and my grace for you and have chosen Islam for you to believe ..." (Quran 5: 3)

This means that religion, as it was brought on by the Prophet and without insertion, is flawless and perfect.
There is no Christmas and no Easter and no New Year's Eve and no Halloween and what other festivals do I know that have nothing to do with the original religion.

Sister, you were spot on when you told your parents you weren't going to take the gifts. But try not to celebrate these holidays. You can also give yourself a gift outside of the non-Muslim holidays, if there is no other way.
I was consistently not at my parents' house this year and asked (if they already had to buy presents) to give them to me on my holidays.
Anyway, Christmas is pretty hypocritical. As if a family atmosphere could only be created on these days, where everyone is happy ... tssss!

And one shouldn't congratulate either. It would be like congratulating these people on their kufr.







Peace be with Ahly Yasiin,

I don't remember where, but I recently read a tradition from one of our imams about how a man came to him and told him that he had become a Muslim and didn't know how to deal with his non-Muslim mother because of that. The Imam replied that if the man had treated his mother well before, he should treat her twice as well now as before.
I am far from giving advice to so-called converted siblings on how to deal with their non-Muslim parents, but I am concerned with general issues.
In addition, very wise people in Islamic history once said: "Calls to our cause (i.e. to Islam) without using your tongue."

As Sister Ameena put it, for me it goes in the direction that you shouldn't pay taxes here either, because the German state is a so-called kuffar state.

With such an attitude here in Germany, it is really no wonder for me that so many people distance themselves from Islam and Muslims ........ that is exactly a small part of the complicity that the Islamic Ummah has their situation and which the Muslims in Europe contribute to this situation ...

Imam Khomeini, may his soul be sanctified, has not even lived a year in Europe, but he has behaved in an exemplary manner here than all Muslims together have done so far.
He implemented Islam the way Allah Ta'ala would expect from everyone, even in the middle of Europe, but through his honorable character traits he won many hearts here, especially in the small village near Paris in which he lived, just because of that that he met people with respect and love - the best example here is his invitation to his fellow believers, the inhabitants of this country, to their RELIGIOUS (of course it is not about cultural insults such as Halloween) holidays a small gift (flowers, something sweet) to do, even if it's just your own neighbors.

By the way, the Koran verse that you quote above, sister, still refers to the third holiday that the Muslims received from Allah - the festival of Ghadir Khumm, the ultimate determination of the caliphate of Imam Ali DIRECTLY after the Messenger of Allah

Peace be with Ahly Yasiin,

jump up
Contributions:2199
Registered since:15.09.2007
Place of residence:Delmenhorst




Hmm?

Quote by Ameena-Malika

Nowhere in the Christian sources is to be found that Prophet Issa (as) ever celebrated Christmas (i.e. his birthday) or Easter (the day of his death or the day of resurrection). These are all things that were not introduced by God and not by Prophet Issa and are therefore not of Christianity either.



Well, even if it is. We don't want other Muslims to tell us what to believe in and not - so we shouldn't tell Christians what to believe in.


Quote by Ameena-Malika
Celebrating Christmas with the kuffar is a bid'a. Not just a bid'a in Islam but a bid'a for Christians from the start. If all of this were correct, we would not have received absolute guidance from the Prophet (saws).



We Christians should also respect their celebrations. We also want you to respect our celebrations. The Messenger of Allah Muhammad (s.) Says:
"What you don't want someone to do to you, don't do it to anyone else."




Quote by Ameena-Malika
Sister, you were spot on when you told your parents you weren't going to take the gifts. But try not to celebrate these holidays. You can also give yourself a gift outside of the non-Muslim holidays, if there is no other way.



Well, isn't giving presents on the Muslim holidays also a "bid'a"?

Quote by Ameena-Malika
I was consistently not at my parents' house this year and asked (if they already had to buy presents) to give them to me on my holidays.



Meanness.

Quote by Ameena-Malika
Anyway, Christmas is pretty hypocritical. As if a family atmosphere could only be created on these days, where everyone is happy ... tssss!



If so, it's nice and let the day be what it wants. Family atmosphere is always nice.

Quote by Ameena-Malika
And one shouldn't congratulate either. It would be like congratulating these people on their kufr.



Wouldn't it be a proof of decency if you still congratulate?


jump up
Contributions:245
Registered since:27.02.2008





Quote
As Sister Ameena put it, for me it goes in the direction that you shouldn't pay taxes here either, because the German state is a so-called kuffar state.



No it does not. There is a difference between obeying the law of the country in which you live (which is a duty for us Muslims) and congratulating someone on something that is against your belief.

If you proceed from decency, then you can also wish people without a direct "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Holidays" that they will spend the days well.

Quote
Well, even if it is. We don't want other Muslims to tell us what to believe in and not - so we shouldn't tell Christians what to believe in.



I didn't say anything like that either, it was an example of not introducing a bid'a into one's religion that is derived from another religion where that is also a bid'a ...

Quote
We Christians should also respect their celebrations. We also want you to respect our celebrations. The Messenger of Allah Muhammad (s.) Says:
"What you don't want someone to do to you, don't do it to anyone else."



Respect is different from acceptance.
If I respect their holidays, I let them celebrate without saying anything.
But if it comes to the point that I congratulate them, then I have accepted their holiday and that is against the faith, because one should only accept things from Islam.

I don't know what is mean about it when I make it clear to my parents that I am not a Christian and therefore have no need to celebrate holidays that mean nothing to me. And if I don't congratulate them, it's not a lack of respect. I call them up and ask them about their health and about things that are more important to my understanding than the day in honor of Holy New Year's Eve or something. Audhubillahi

La kum dinukum wa liya din.

jump up
Contributions:427
Registered since:15.06.2008





Quote
No it does not. There is a difference between following the law of the country in which you live (which is a duty for us Muslims) and congratulating someone on something against your belief is.



If it against if it were to believe, then that would mean that it is haram. But to declare something as haram, you have to have evidence of it. It is not possible to argue out of your head, you need solid evidence.

Quote
If you proceed from decency, then you can also wish people without a direct "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Holidays" that they will spend the days well.



Everyone should handle it the way they want. But one cannot use Islam as the basis of argument for this example. Christians celebrate the birthday of Jesus (a.s.), whether it is the right day or not does not matter.

By the way, the same line of argument is used by some hateful and deluded schools in Islam to forbid Muslims from celebrating the birthday of their revered Prophet (s.a.a.s).

Most Muslims, however, abhor such transgressors who, in the zeal of their "haram madness", try to forbid the Muslims from everything.

Quote
I didn't say anything like that either, it was an example of not introducing a bid'a into one's religion that is derived from another religion where that is also a bid'a ...



We do not need to interfere in the theological discussions of other religions. If they celebrate Christmas as the birthday of Jesus (a.s.), then we can congratulate them. Whether or not it is a bid'a for them is their difficulty.

Quote
Respect is different from acceptance.
If I respect their holidays, I let them celebrate without saying anything.



That is at most tolerate. But there is no need to argue about terminology. Nobody says yes that you can congratulate them got to. Man should but congratulate them. First of all, you can't say it forbidden is.

jump up
Contributions:4015
Registered since:15.02.2008



With Sunnis it is forbidden to accept gifts, with Shiites it is allowed, it's as simple as that. We don't need to justify anything, if that's the case for Sunnis, we have to accept it, even if it doesn't seem understandable. Whether Ameena asked her parents to give her the Christmas presents to Id ul Fitr or Id al Adha would benefit Islam, I would like to leave an open question, but everyone as they wish.


It is not allowed, even in the Shia, to imitate customs alien to Islam such as Christmas trees or Easter bunnies, but they are not of Christian but of pagan origin anyway.

jump up
Contributions:1343
Registered since:15.09.2007



Quote by Ameena-Malika

I don't know what is mean about it when I make it clear to my parents that I am not a Christian and therefore have no need to celebrate holidays that mean nothing to me. And if I don't congratulate them, it's not a lack of respect. I call them up and ask them about their health and about things that are more important to my understanding than the day in honor of Holy New Year's Eve or something.



dear sister, the "common" of the brother was probably related to the following statement:

Quote by Ameena-Malika
I consistently didn't go to see my parents this year and I asked (if you already have to buy presents) to give them to me on my holidays.



And from an Islamic point of view, such behavior is to be regarded as "Qati Rahm", which is one of the greatest sins. In German one would say "breaking off the relationship with the closest relatives". Don't you think that your parents were sad that you "consistently failed to visit" them for a year? Allah (swt) did not ask such a thing of us, especially not if our parents or relatives belong to another religion or no religion at all. On the contrary, the Merciful Allah (swt) has called us to be benevolent and loving to our relatives, especially towards our parents, even if they turn away from us and want to break off contact. And that takes more than just calling them and asking how they are. This is the last step in order not to cut the relationship completely. But it shouldn't come that far anyway, especially not from our side. Unfortunately, your words are not shaped by charity and love, but by harshness and aversion. And that towards the parents is really a meanness that Allah (swt) does not accept.

jump up